Kākā wrestling on a desk in Wellington.

Top backyard wildlife encounters of 2022

We present a completely subjective, non-exhaustive, contestable list of the top backyard wildlife encounters of 2022.  Predator control, responsible pet ownership and native planting are vital ingredients in turning your patch of land, no matter the size, into a place that birds, bugs and lizards want to visit – on their terms. Feeding animals, getting … Continue reading Top backyard wildlife encounters of 2022

A wrapped gift.

Seasons tweetings: give a nature-friendly gift this year

Gift inspiration for buying for yourself or the wildlife lover in your life. Not just nature-themed, many of these present ideas give back to conservation too, which means you’ll surely end up on Santa’s nice list.  Voucher Give the gift of choice! Introducing the Predator Free New Zealand Trust gift voucher for our online shop, … Continue reading Seasons tweetings: give a nature-friendly gift this year

Finn leaning against a truck.

First-class: predator free apprentice graduate becomes second-in-command

Two years ago, Finn Giddy was working his first serious job out of high school digging trenches, unsure of his career prospects. Now, he’s the first graduate of the predator free apprenticeship programme – and his career is off to a roaring start. Reflecting on the journey that brought him to his dream career working … Continue reading First-class: predator free apprentice graduate becomes second-in-command

A spider in a web with hearts around it.

Not creepy, just crawly: spiders are cooler than you think

This Halloween, spare a little love for symbols of the spooky season: spiders.  Supposedly scary but mostly misunderstood, these eight-legged creatures are vital to nature. There are more than 2000 species of pūngāwerewere (spider) in Aotearoa New Zealand, and most of them are endemic (i.e. as unique as the kiwi and kākāpō). Look beyond their … Continue reading Not creepy, just crawly: spiders are cooler than you think

Māia crouched inspecting a trap with mountain landscape in background.

Kiwi calling: Predator Free NZ Trust apprentice Māia Gibbs at home on the range

Like many of us, Māia Gibbs grew up never having seen a kiwi in the wild. Now, she gets up close and personal while helping save the kiwi as a Predator Free NZ Trust apprentice.  Holding a fluffy, pear-shaped ball of feathers with strong talons Māia, 21, is living the dream of many in a … Continue reading Kiwi calling: Predator Free NZ Trust apprentice Māia Gibbs at home on the range

Two kererū perched in a tree.

Funding awarded to bring birds and bugs back to backyards

Restoring native wildlife to urban areas is gaining momentum. Another 13 community groups across the motu (country) will receive a portion of $50,000 to realise their trapping dreams.  The Predator Free New Zealand Trust helps outstanding predator free communities buy bait stations, chew cards, and traps and to spread the word in their communities.  Over … Continue reading Funding awarded to bring birds and bugs back to backyards

Cat being microchipped.

Cat catastrophe: Managing our feline companions

Part 2 of our series Cat catastrope: Why are we behind Australia in managing cats? Curfews, leash walking, registration, and desexing. These are just some of the ways Australia is addressing domestic cat management and getting further ahead of Aotearoa New Zealand in protecting their threatened native species. In part two of this three-part series, … Continue reading Cat catastrophe: Managing our feline companions

A kākāpo

Why kākāpō are called kākāpō and other wildlife names

In Aotearoa New Zealand Māori are ‘tangata whenua’ – people of the land. This reflects the importance of te taiao (the environment) to Māori identity, culture, and tikanga.  Te reo Māori is shaped by the unique environment and wildlife. There is a depth of meaning to te reo Māori words. Often a one or two-word … Continue reading Why kākāpō are called kākāpō and other wildlife names

Elizabeth working with takahe

Bright future: 5 rangatahi shaping conservation

When it comes to protecting nature, these five rangatahi “understood the assignment”. There’s a question mark hanging over their future ability to enjoy wildlife and wild places in Aotearoa New Zealand, but these rangatahi have taken conservation into their own hands. 1. Finn Giddy – trapper and hunter Finn is combining his love of hunting … Continue reading Bright future: 5 rangatahi shaping conservation